Killing our Future, Killing our Past

Killing our Future, Killing our Past

 

Killing our Future, Killing our Past

The Final Solution

Our ageing population is a sober comment on our collective unwillingness to put selfishness aside and welcome children into our midst. We need a huge, stable population in order to maintain our first-world infrastructure and technology. Our economic future is threatened by a decrease in the number of workers contributing their skills and taxes to keeping our country running. But if you think that demographic outlook is bleak, then the solution being offered by the minions of death is even bleaker: die Endlösung – the Final Solution. For the Nazis, die Endlösung was the plan to be finally rid of the Jews. For enthusiasts of euthanasia, the final solution is a plan to legislate for death at the end of productive life.

In a state like Victoria, where abortion is available on demand through all nine months of pregnancy, it’s not surprising that euthanasia will continue to rear its ugly head. Parliament’s cross-party Legal and Social Issues Committee last week released its pro-death report, the result of ten months’ investigation into terminally-ill patients in the state.

Predictably, there is a great deal of support from within the medical community, and a cohort of benevolent-sounding ‘experts’ have submitted their soothing arguments for killing our elderly and vulnerable, rather than offering them life-affirming care and attention.

So what is to stop the wholesale slaughter of our elderly and disabled when our most valuable assets, our children, are already being tossed away without a thought? After all, in utilitarian terms, it makes a great deal of sense to set a limit on our lifetimes and then calmly enact our deaths.

 

Killing our future, killing our past

But back to abortion for a moment: what does rampant abortion say about a society? What message does it give?

“I’m not ready to be a parent”

“This wasn’t part of my plans.”

“It is better to kill my child than allow it to suffer.”

“It’s my body, my choice.”

“I won’t make room in my life for you.”

“If I donate my baby’s body to science, this will have had purpose”

It is the language of confused and overwhelmed mothers with nowhere to turn, of women who won’t make the effort to become mothers, of medical staff who ‘know best’, of men who want sex without its consequences, of families who don’t have the will to support a young pregnant girl in their midst. It is the language of people who have no connection to the future, no hope.

Abortion ruptures our link with the future; we lose hope when children, so full of promise, are killed by our will or our consent or our apathy. Little children have the potential to turn lives around, to give mothers and fathers a reason to keep going when hope seems lost, to motivate parents to better themselves, to urge us on past our natural abilities.

It is similar to that hopeless message of euthanasia and assisted-suicide advocates:

“I’m not ready to be a carer”

“It’s better to kill my parents than allow them to suffer”

“It’s my body, my choice”

“I won’t make room in my life (or my home) for old people” – and the same applies to poverty, sickness, suffering: “I won’t make room in my life for you.”

“If I donate my organs, then this will have had purpose.”

But the difference is that, shockingly, by allowing the elderly to kill themselves, or be killed, we sever our ties with a family member we have known. We reject the memories, the presence, the love of someone who has been part of our lives. We set a very narrow limit on our love for them – they must be convenient and healthy, in order to continue to warrant our affection.

What would our societies look like without the older generations? Without that link to our past? Without that ‘wisdom of the grey haired’? Would we forget the days when our elderly were respected, when they were not exterminated when their economic value ended? History is already being rewritten in many liberal institutions and in mainstream media. Imagine the effect of having no elderly people left to clarify historical facts or to help us make sense of the past!

 

Liberal Heaven

It is said that those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it: without a handle on the past, that is exactly what would happen if euthanasia became yet another lifestyle choice, to mimic abortion at the opposite end of the spectrum. History would be annihilated and the culture would devour itself in an endless loop of pleasure, consumption and death. Every culture that has failed to respect life – and failed to respect the institution that safeguards the transmission of life, the family – has crumbled.

The value of human life can never be overstated. Tragedies like the Orlando massacre never fail to elicit a response from the public. We see the blood, the ambulances, torment on the faces of bystanders and families. We put ourselves in their places and grieve with them for a moment. We know that something is deeply wrong, that lives have been cut short and there there has been a rupture in the continuum of life.

But abortion and euthanasia happen daily in our midst; and to our shame, those ruptures are legal, or so common as to be practically legal.

So let’s kill our future and kill our past and create a liberal heaven: life would become a jaded succession of experiences, each more outrageous, but less fulfilling than the last. We’ll keep slaughtering unwanted babies, but create gene-edited children for wealthy same-sex couples. We’ll keep raising children to have no self-control and indoctrinating them with worldly philosophies. And we’ll let our elderly know that the clock is ticking down for them, and us, as we speed towards doomsday on our nihilistic fast train.

By making a heaven for liberals we’d be creating a hell on earth for everyone, with no past, no future and no hope.

 

 

 

Author: genericmum

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